Category Archives: Books

Review: Brightest Day, Vol. 1

Brightest Day, Vol. 1
Brightest Day, Vol. 1 by Geoff Johns
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

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Review: American Vampire, Vol. 2

American Vampire, Vol. 2
American Vampire, Vol. 2 by Scott Snyder
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Volume 2 of the series moves forward a few years but continues with Skinner, now living in Las Vegas and Pearl, living quietly in a sleepy small town.

The story is split in 2 parts with the first drawn by Rafael Albuquerque and the second by Mateo Santaluco. While both artists are great and stylistic cohesive, there is something about Albuquerque’s work that is more consistently appealing. I found myself stopping to study panels and marveling at how he used space on a page. His work also seemed to have more synergy with Snyder’s storytelling taking full advantage of the Hoover Dam era of Las Vegas’ history and the sinister Skinner.

Pearl’s story seems almost subdued in contrast and while not boring, doesn’t rise to the same excitement as Skinner’s.

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Review: FreakAngels: Volume 5

FreakAngels: Volume 5
FreakAngels: Volume 5 by Warren Ellis
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

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Review: FreakAngels, Vol. 4

FreakAngels, Vol. 4
FreakAngels, Vol. 4 by Warren Ellis
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

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Review: Uncanny X-Men: Sisterhood TPB

Uncanny X-Men: Sisterhood TPB
Uncanny X-Men: Sisterhood TPB by Matt Fraction
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

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Review: X-Men Legacy: Emplate Premiere HC (X-Men

X-Men Legacy: Emplate Premiere HC (X-Men
X-Men Legacy: Emplate Premiere HC (X-Men by Mike Carey
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

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Review: Wonderstruck

Wonderstruck
Wonderstruck by Brian Selznick
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Once again Selznick weaves historical elements around a simple focal point. In [b:The Invention of Hugo Cabret|9673436|The Invention of Hugo Cabret|Brian Selznick|http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51VcEWaqKWL._SL75_.jpg|527941], the focal point was the magic of film and this time he uses museums. In both stories, the protagonist is a young boy facing extreme challenges to find their place in the world and unlocking the secrets of their past.

Wonderstruck begins shortly after Ben’s mother dies in a car accident and he a string of events sends him on a quest to find the father he knows nearly nothing about. He leaves Minnesota and heads for New York City with just a locket with a man’s picture, a first name, an old address, a book about museum and a bookmark from a used book store.

Once again Selznick employs his own beautiful sketches to tell broad swaths of story but this time the first part of the book tells the story of a girl 50 years in the past obsessed with a famous actress of film and stage. The connection between the girl and Ben blossoms slowly but movingly.

Wonderstruck isn’t as immediate as Hugo but once again Selznick brings a sense of childhood awe that I wonder if it still exists for kids today. That sense of grand adventure that comes when the world seems so much bigger and life didn’t seem to be a gallop pace. I wonderful way to reconnect not only with history but our own childhood.

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